The Top Mobility Scooters for the Elderly

Are you elderly, or disabled and are in the market for purchasing a new electric mobility scooter? If so, you will want to be sure that you find the best one. There are various factors that have to be considered if you want to find yourself the best electric mobility scooters to consider investing in. Below, we will be going over some of the top things to look at and consider when you are looking to find the best ones.

Finding The Best Electric Mobility Scooters

1. Scooter Price.

The price of the scooter is likely going to be the major deciding factor when it comes to purchasing the right one. Not only do you want to get a good value for your money, but you will also want to try to find one that is going to supply you with a scooter that fits within your budget. If you are dealing with a tight budget, you will likely factor this into your decision making process and you will avoid investing in the higher end models. Because there are electric mobility scooters available for various budgets, you want to try to find the one that is going to work for your specific needs. The price is a major factor that has to be considered.

2. Reviews.

Another major thing that you are going to need to look at and consider when it comes to finding the right electric disability scooter to invest in is the reviews of the scooters on the market. You want to try to find the disabled scooter that has the best overall reviews in order to really be able to find the right one to invest in for your lifestyle. By purchasing the electric scooter with the best reviews, you should be able to successfully navigate through the market and really find the scooter that is most likely to satisfy your needs.

3. Warranty.

Whenever you are looking to invest so much money into one machine or product, you also want to consider the kind of extended warranty that is going to come with it. Because an electric disabled  scooter is likely going to be used on a daily basis and because you are investing so much money into it, it is going to be important to find one that has the warranty that is going to cover your scooter for a long time. That way, you know that you will not be responsible for paying for anything that might be a result of a manufacturing defect. Having a warranty that backs up the purchase can make things much more manageable and it can reduce a lot of the perceived risk that you are taking whenever you make the decision to spend so much money on a electric mobility scooter.

4. Portability.

Another major factor that is going to influence your decision greatly is the level of portability that the scooter comes with and the level that you are looking for. Obviously, if you are not interested in moving the scooter around and taking it with you in a vehicle, this is not something that will likely be important to your overall decision. However, if you are planning on traveling with it, portability can be a huge factor.

By looking at all of the factors above, you should be able to find a whole selection of competitively priced mobility scooters here http://mobilityandcomfort.co.uk/product-category/electric-mobility-scooters/.

Thanks for reading, regards Josh.

Will I be Found Disabled for Social Security Disability?

This segment of Social Security Disability Audio addresses a question that is often asked, and perhaps, in truth, asked by every single individual who decides to file a claim for disability benefits with the social security administration. That question is “Will I be found disabled by social security?”.

To give you an idea of the statistics, roughly seven out of 10 claimants who apply for disability benefits with SSA are not found disabled initially. And of those individuals who wisely decide to appeal the denial of their initial claim, more than eight out of ten are denied again. However, for those who decide to appeal a second time, this time requesting a disability hearing before a federal judge, the odds are actually favorable that they will win their case.

As this segment of the podcast illustrates, medical records are what cases are decided on. And the content of a claimant’s medical records can serve to support a case or hinder it. Some claimants may find it helpful, prior to filing a claim for benefits, to look at their own medical records to get an idea of what their records actually say about their condition and limitations. If their records have little to nothing to say about their condition, they may find it practical to speak with their physician to see if the physician can make an attempt to record observations about their physical and/or limitations (for example, difficulty sitting, standing, stooping, crouching, bending, reaching, etc). This type of information, which relates to a disability claimant’s functional capacity, is exactly the type of information that social security looks for when it decides whether to approve or deny a disability claim. However, in all candor, it goes without saying that no one should hold their breath after asking their doctor to adjust his or her approach to recording office notes.

Having a Severe Condition and Qualifying for Disability

It’s apparent to every individual who decides to file for social security disability or SSI disability that an applicant must have an impairment of some kind, either physical or mental in nature, or a combination of impairments (that may be physical, mental, or both). Furthermore, the great majority of applicants for SSD and SSI benefits realize that the strength of an adult’s claim will hinge on the extent to which their ability to engage in work activity will be affected. However, few disability claimants typically have any concrete idea as to how the social security administration, through its use of judges and claims examiners, actually makes the determination as to whether or not a claimant can work. The answer is actually fairly simple. Disability adjudicators, the individuals who make decisions on claims (judges and examiners) evaluate a claimant’s medical records to ascertain if their impairment is severe. The records are also evaluated in an attempt to learn how the claimant’s condition functionally limits them and interferes with their ability to perform work activity. By rating a person’s current abilities and limitations, and then comparing this rating to what was required in the jobs previously held by the claimant, social security can determine whether or not a return to past work is possible. Social security also uses the claimant’s work history information and their medical information to determine if the claimant might be found capable of performing some other type of work, assuming they cannot return to their past work. However, one overriding factor in this process is whether or not the claimant worked and received earnings (or is currently working and receiving earnings) at the substantial gainful activity level. As this segment explains, SGA is a monthly earnings limit that cannot be exceeded by anyone filing for disability or receiving disability benefits. The amount is indexed to the cost of living and, therefore, does change annually.

Welcome to Disability Audio

Disability Audio looks at all physical and mental impairments the same way. In other words, to be approved for disability benefits on the basis of one or more conditions, the condition must be severe enough that it prevents an individual from being able to perform substantial gainful work activity for a year or longer, or be severe enough that it may possible result in death.

Stress is not a condition that is listed in the SSA blue book; however, when most individuals list “stress” on a claim for disability, they are referring to an anxiety related disorder. Anxiety disorders do have their own section in the impairment listing manual for consideration.

In any event, disability examiners base their determinations on what the medical records have to say about a claimant’s condition, versus what the claimant has to say about their condition. More specifically, examiners use the information contained in the records to rate a claimant’s residual functional capacity, a rating of what a person can still do and can no longer do. Functional capacity ratings including physical ratings and mental ratings.

How are functional capacity ratings used? Essentially, by gauging what an individual is presently capable of doing and comparing it the physical and/or mental requirements of jobs that, in the view of the social security administration, a person might be capable of doing.

Of course, it should be noted that individuals who are filing for disability based on stress or some type of anxiety disorder should attempt to get treatment from a mental health professional. Social Security decision makers generally look for treatment records from a mental health treatment professional that establish a longitudinal history of diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis.